Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)
product details

Overall size of this product is .

The image area of the print measures .

description
Along with two other similar posters on rehousing and health, this was designed by Games to be issued to the forcesthrough the Army Bureau of Current Affairs. The image is a startling vision of a future world set in the reality of a bomb damagedcountry. The openness of the new architecture both plays with the open, roofless setting of the old classroom and with its former darktraditional state. This vision of a future urban Britain in which present evils would be righted, contrasts strongly with Frank Newbould'smore traditional vision of an idyllic, pastoral, almost historical Britain in his posters for the same series.Games worked for the War Office between 1941 and 1946, producing over 100 poster designs. His wartime work was outstanding, displayingsuperb technical mastery. He controlled every element of the design to serve the message, a message in which he strongly believed. In 1948he wrote in 'Art and Industry', 'I felt strongly that the high purpose of the wartime posters was mainly responsible for their excellence'.Impington Village College building was designed by Walter Gropius and Maxwell Fry in the 1930s to bring the best of modern internationaldesign to serve the community. Gropius had been the first head of the German Bauhaus Institute before being driven out by Hitler. Thebuilding embodied the principles of Bauhaus design; a simplicity of design and materials and unity of form and function.
additional information
Date Second World War
Cat Number Art.IWM PST 2907
Artist / Maker Games, Abram
More about this image on IWM Collections

Your Britain - Fight for it Now (School)

  • £25



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